Practical and ideological changes in a post-pandemic world

It is clear nowadays that there are marked differences in the way climate and environmental changes and how their effects on health and their implications have been managed, both in terms of countries’ success in preserving the health of their citizens, and in the magnitude of inequalities. Unfortunately, no matter how bad climate and environmental changes were before the pandemic, and no matter how hard it exposed the inequalities in our society, the post-pandemic world may experience even greater climatic and environmental changes and inequalities.

Is the world still talking about climate change?

In Australia, despite the work of our world-leading scientists, climate change is a vexed political topic, rather than a question of science and policy. Join climate scientist and author of The Future Eaters and The Weather Makers, Tim Flannery, marine ecologist Adriana Vergés, social researcher, author of How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference, Rebecca Huntley and marine biologist and Dean of Science at UNSW Sydney, Emma Johnston to find out how we might turn these pressing climate conversations into climate solutions.

Ocean economics

The need for better governance of human activities in the ocean space has been widely recognized for years and current frameworks do not consider the effects of climate change. The upcoming UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021–2030) is a prime opportunity for a new framework to be adopted.