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University of Edinburgh develops innovative online education

Taught by instructors with decades of experience in climate change and online learning, this empowering course is a collaboration between leading experts in the University of Edinburgh and the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. You’ll learn about the solutions needed from governments and big business, how you can help to make them do more, and what…

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Reducing methane production in dairy cattle

Methane is colorless, odorless and its contribution to global warming is 25 times greater than carbon dioxide (CO2). Also, it represents 5-7% of energy loss from dairy cows in standard diets, negatively affecting animal production.

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Transforming Social Inequalities Through Inclusive Climate Action in Africa

Multi-dimensional poverty and inequality continue to persist in Africa’s societies.

The majority of African livelihoods rely on income from agricultural activities, which makes them vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. At the same time, the population on the continent is fast growing, which translates into rapid expansion of urban areas and associated infrastructural needs.

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Climate change education with a STEAM approach

In this scientific-technological and globalised era, climate change education focuses extensively on long-term, global consequences of anthropogenic climate change, and proclaims that only scientific-technological advances can help all of us save our planet earth.

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Practical and ideological changes in a post-pandemic world

It is clear nowadays that there are marked differences in the way climate and environmental changes and how their effects on health and their implications have been managed, both in terms of countries’ success in preserving the health of their citizens, and in the magnitude of inequalities. Unfortunately, no matter how bad climate and environmental changes were before the pandemic, and no matter how hard it exposed the inequalities in our society, the post-pandemic world may experience even greater climatic and environmental changes and inequalities.

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